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Book of Madness: Whispers Without, Chaos Within
 
$9.99
Average Rating:3.8 / 5
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Book of Madness: Whispers Without, Chaos Within
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Book of Madness: Whispers Without, Chaos Within
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/16/2020 13:21:35

This book is pretty good, though it shows its age and has largely been superseded by more recent books, like the Revised Book of Madness, Infernalism and Book of the Fallen. Still, it covers a lot of ground. It seems to less be about "madness" and more about "antagonists" as it has a whole chapter on Paradox, listing spirits, clarifying Realms and giving several theories as to how Paradox works from random mages. The Nephandi chapter gave a bit of meat to formerly vague antagonists, and the Marauders chapter inched away from "Mage dedicated to dynamism that appears insane" to "Metaphysically mentally ill mage" though with a subconscious devotion to Dynamism. The Demons and Demon Cults chapter doesn't really have a strong analogue anywhere else, with parts of it overlapping with future books, but still might be one of the better sources for infernalism in Mage. And the final chapter on Umbrood was surprisingly concrete.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Book of Madness: Whispers Without, Chaos Within
Publisher: White Wolf
by Justin B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/12/2010 22:40:42

Well-written sourcebook on adversaries for Mage: The Ascension. Book of Madness drives home the point that a human being who has sold him/herself out to the powers of darkness is by far scarier than the demons themselves. These evildoers are called Nephandi, and includes both mages who make pacts with demons for power and glory, and ones who are philosophically committed to undoing creation itself.

Also covered are Marauders, insane mages who warp reality around them into their own private universe and are immune to the cosmic backlash suffered by Mages known as paradox, an extensive essay on the nature of Paradox and belief in Mage: the Ascension, and write-ups on a variety of NPCs, mythological creatures, and demonic entities.

Book of Madness doesn't give extensive coverage on how Nephandic corruption affects the different spheres of magic in the game (other than the sphere of entropy); this is handled better in the revised edition of the book.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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