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World of Darkness Solo Adventures
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/07/2019 22:35:22

Interesting rules. I haven't tried to play with them yet, but they seem like an interesting method to generate writing prompts for a story. Though marked as a World of Darkness book, the mechanics inside look very Chronicles of Darkness (assumed difficulty of 8, changing dicepool rather than target number, etc).



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness Solo Adventures
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100 Books to Find on a Mage’s Bookshelf
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/07/2019 22:34:16

This is a nice little book describing 100 books that a mage could have on their shelf. The books are fairly sparsely defined with a title, author and a very brief description. They are good for a bit of flavor and could act as the basic version of a grmoire. the biggest criticism I have is that the text is handling a two-page spread as a single page, which makes it more awkward to read.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
100 Books to Find on a Mage’s Bookshelf
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Creator Reply:
I thought that template didn't seem to be working right. I've uploaded a new version that should fix it, although I may upload another version again at a later point, as I wasn't entirely happy with this one.
Convention Book: Void Engineers
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/03/2019 15:17:09

"The Technocracy is wrong." The Void Engineers start out with a strong critical statement. Of course, they don't mean this morally, they mean it in the sense of incorrect. The Technocracy's fears, echoed in every other Revised Convention book, that the Void Engineers might abandon the Union, are baseless. Instead, the Void Engineers are clinging to it, desperately trying to keep things together because only with the Union can they keep Earth safe from entirely new classes of threat.

The Void Engineers were hit hard by the Dimensional Anomaly, and this book delivers on those chases beautifully. From the opening fiction (and the closing) showing a group of Void Engineers (and an Iteration X stowaway) to the text of the book, lots of changes are explored and the Void Engineers will never be the same. It even closes in the last sentences with the last Revised advancement of the meta plot: the Nephandi retaking Mus from the Technocracy, putting in another chapter of the saga started in the Mage 2nd Edition core book's opening fiction.

The book is organized similarly to other Convention books, but it has an extra chapter in it. It starts with a history of the Void Engineers, particularly updated to the present, discussing some of the changes (Existential Threats Directorate instead of DSEATC, etc) and it is the first of the new Convention books to have a jargon section, which makes an excellent reference (rather than having to skim through to find things like rankings and other bold-faced terms like in the others). The Void Engineer takes on the other Conventions and the Traditions are quite different from other Conventions: the Void Engineers value openness and science so they like the Progenitors and hate the New World Order (especially with all the deprocessing that they need to do). They tolerate the Syndicate and worry about Iteration X. Oddly, among the Traditions, the Void Engineers have grown close to the Euthanatos, their fellow fighters against Threat Null. It's also mentioned that working with Etherites against Null is extra effective.

Chapter 2 provides rankings, honors and awards, the requirements to become a Void Engineer, and a discussion of the methodologies. It's well-done, but nothing that isn't the same as the other Convention books, just about the Void Engineers instead of a different Convention.

Chapter 3 is something different. Chapter 4 will contain more standard things (procedures, devices, etc) but Chapter 3 focuses on the Void Engineer Cosmology and what is out there. It even has a map, placing the Horizon at the asteroid belt (and talking about how it has moved over time, and the Void Engineer goal of pushing it further and further out) and a discussion of how to get to virtually any place in the known Universe. Then it hits on four pages just on the Dimensional Anomaly, how it works and how they deal with it, before turning to a discussion of specific places, like the Cop (both old and new), Darkside, and the Void Engineer views of the Shard and Shade Realms. But after that, it hits the big deal: Threat Null. First mentioned in the Syndicate book and alluded to constantly throughout this one as a dire threat that they can't tell the rest of the Union the details of, we find out why at the end of Chapter 3. Threat Null is the Technocratic Union, or at least, the descendants of it that were lost in the Anomaly. Now, mutated and changed by the Void, they've become a sort of metastasized version of themselves, and when they meet Processed Technocrats, they speak with the voice of Control. The biggest mystery left completely unresolved with them, though, is why there are no apparent Void Engineers in Null. Null is probably the most innovative antagonist added to Mage since near the beginning, and I look forward to seeing how it develops as the line comes back to life.

Chapter 4 is back to the Convention book routine, by and large: notable engineers, some legends (which include the narrator of the history in the 1st Edition Void Engineers book, now a known Nephandus) and more information on Station Yemaja which was mentioned several times in Progenitors Revised. Then general advice for STing for Void Engineers and a Voidship crew. Dimensional Science and Void Correspondence are fairly straightforward alternate approaches to spheres. The best thing in this section, though, are the Voidcraft rules. How to build them, how much they cost, what spheres are required, and how Voidcraft Combat works, along with several examples, including the X160 Qui La Machinae, which costs roughly $7.8 billion to build. This high price explains why the Technocracy doesn't have an absolutely massive fleet, and sets up great possibilities for Void Engineer salvage operations: why build a new $7.8 billion ship when you can try to find an old one (if you have a lead) and can fit it up and upgrade it for much less?

Overall, an excellent book and an excellent end to the Revised line as M20 got off the ground. Hopefully, some of these threads will be explored further (M20 mentioned them, but Technocracy: Reloaded could do something, and hopefully if and when it happens, there's M5).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Convention Book: Void Engineers
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Convention Book: Syndicate
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/31/2019 02:48:05

"Reality is in the black." The Syndicate book opens up as optimistic as the New World Order book did, but the book itself actually sells their optimism. Whether you agree or not with their philosophy, it's absolutely dominant in reality and bringing them power and influence.

This book had some problems that the others lacked (we'll talk about numbers in a minute), and others that they had but less so (such as a need for more editing), but overall it was still an excellent book and necessary for anyone who wants to play Syndicate characters or use them as believable NPCs.

Regarding the Enlightened population and hangers on, the book suggests that Extraordinary Citizens are created by adversity: the economic downtown is what they credit the rise of the Extraordinary Citizen covered in both NWO and Progenitors. They also suggest that the mage population is MUCH higher than other books have indicated, referring to "tens of thousands of Constructs" which, even by generous notions of how many mages there are, would indicate some that have no Enlightened personnel at all.

The tension between the Syndicate and the NWO is a constant throughout the book. From terminology at the very beginning to later when the Syndicate comes out as anti-DRM, pro-net neutrality, anti-surveillance, etc, indicating a focus on bottom-up rather than top-down control. They've even got factions trying to mend the rift between the two Conventions, because a Technocratic Civil War would be an absolute disaster (and at this point, if M5 comes and doesn't bring a Technocratic Civil War, or give a strong reason it didn't happen, I'll be disappointed).

A minor aside: the sidebar "The Jewish Syndicate" on page 26 is a welcome addition. Jewish issues have not been handled well by Mage (or the World of Darkness in general, with one notable exception) and seeing this brought up explicitly was good. It was a small thing, but actually brought up and confronted one of the many issues that show up (I would have preferred also mentioning something about Media Control given the belief that Jews control the media, but it's still better than really all other Mage books).

The "others" section has a lot of meat to it. The discussion of the Traditions indicates that cultural appropriation is a powerful weapon against the Traditions: take their source cultures, commodotize and trivialize. Talking about the Masses, they indicate that they love humanity as it is, not how it "could" be like the other Conventions, and make a solid case for it. And, of course, there's the first mention of "Threat Null."

The book continues to hit standard points and moves on to Methodologies after the basic internal structure. And then, after said standard things, suddenly "The SPD is gone, no one knows what happened, but money keeps showing up." This is another metaplot element I hope is expanded on in the future, with the Werewolf/Mage crossover potential, it'd be almost criminal to ignore it.

The highlight of the remainder is Primal Utility, the third Technocracy alternate sphere. It's damn good, and adds a lot, removing some powers (Prime Weapons) but adding Primal Ventures to the game gives the Syndicate more depth and reduces the distance between game mechanics and setting.

As a closing thought, the Syndicate comes off as far and away the most mystic of the Conventions. In fact, the Syndicate and the Order of Hermes have many things in common. The focus on the power and necessity of a hierarchy, the power of Will (individual for Hermetics, Collective for Syndicate), the love of competition, and the high level of flexibility...just an interesting, though likely unintentional, comparison.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Convention Book: Syndicate
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Convention Book: Progenitors
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/29/2019 16:10:57

"The Technocracy is sick." stands in stark contrast with the opening optimism of the NWO book that Progenitors comes out on the heels of. While the New World Order is depicted as optimistic but in many ways fundamentally corrupt, the Progenitors own their corruption in this book, though most of the text still downplays it to allow them to appear as heroes despite many of the terrible things that they are doing in their attempts to "heal" the Union.

Shattered by the Dimensional Anomaly, they've had to build themselves a new way of interacting with the world around them and the Union as a whole. The Progenitors, of all Technocratic groups, are experimenting with democracy in their Convention but at the same time, know that old ways die slowly. They're in many ways more self-aware than the NWO, who view their pathologies as triumphs, and instead they see themselves as sacrificing themselves for the good of the Union when they do horrific things.

The history section is solid and well-told, though nothing that readers of previous Mage books haven't seen before. The views on the other Conventions shows that they have diagnosed many of the Union's problems, and see the Technocratic Civil War and the Nephandic Infiltration issues as the two most pressing things (this is backed up by the opening and closing fiction focusing on bringing in Progenitors who have disappeared and using them to help mend rifts between NWO and Syndicate agents). The views of the Traditions, though, are less rosy than those of the NWO: the Progenitors find very little of value in the Traditions, and the growing Applied Sciences movement is in alignment with Iteration X on reinstating the Pogrom. The "other" section is most interesting, because it indicates that the very basics of Vampires and Werewolves is common knowledge within the Convention.

The Progenitors may be experimenting with democracy, but they're still organized like an academic department, with students, research assistants, primary investigators, etc. One of the most interesting parts of Chapter Two are the "micro" Methodologies, expanding the scope of the Progenitors and each of them just demands a proper fleshing out all on their own.

Much of the darkness of the Progenitors is hidden in the Procedures section, Primal Infusions and Primal Nets are described, and they are used to extract Primal Energy from the dying.

The most novel section is "Genegineered Creatures" which have the statistics for and rules for using fully non-human characters created through genetic tampering, such as uplifted dolphins, lizard people and modern dinosaurs. While a bit harder to justify without the Horizon Constructs, these add something truly new for the Progenitors, and there's hints that some of them might be capable of Enlightenment...so when a player asks "Can I play an Awakened Velociraptor" not only are there rules, but also explanations for why it might not be the best character concept (unless, of course, you plan your game to permit them.)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Convention Book: Progenitors
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Convention Book: N.W.O.
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/28/2019 12:14:11

"The Technocracy is winning" starts the first in the ten-years-delayed completion of the Revised Convention Books, and it sets the tone. (the other three all have similar first lines that may or may not be drastically at odds with this one, but each sets the tone for the book fantastically.)

The overall tone of the book is "We can take humanity to glorious new heights in this era, things we'd never even imagined before." However, there is a pall over the entire book indicating that the New World Order is still in many ways the old organization, and that the rot that was at the core of it is still there (and, in the corners, it sheds a bit of darkness on Iteration X that it's Revised Convention Book didn't show). The opening fiction shows that they're still "processing" superstitionists, but now they're putting them into cyborg bodies against their will and using them as shock troops. This perfectly sets up the general tone of "optimism, but something is wrong here" that the rest of the book portrays.

The history is told through the dissertation (which we must be seeing a short version of, as I've never heard of a history dissertation that would fit into a book like this!) delivered by an up-and-coming member of the NWO. We're told that it's laced with Mind procedures to subtly bring whoever reads it in line with the thoughts expressed and into agreement with its author. Reading between the lines (and sometimes in the text itself), members of the New World Order (and particularly the Ivory Tower) are constantly wondering if their thoughts are their own and to what extent they've been compromised by their fellows, though the text itself hides the natural sense of paranoia that this would engender.

The profiles of other groups focus on how easily they can be converted to the Technocracy (and this focus subtly reinforces the Templar/Cabal of Pure Thought origin theory that is dismissed in the earlier part of the book) and also keep the tension high on the Nephandic Infiltration and the Technocratic Civil War metaplot elements, though neither has any payoff to the current date.

Chapter two is a more standard overview of the ranks within the NWO and the methodologies that make it up, including the new "The Feed" which monitors and manages social media, and are clearly the most underappreciated Technocrats out there, considering the sheer deluge they need to manage. Unfortunately, there is very little real discussion of the Digital Web, which would have been nice, given how much the internet has changed since 1998, when Digital Web 2.0 was released. Perhaps 3.0 will eventually happen.

Chapter three is quite strong, with a section on NWO legends and fronts, how to run and NWO troupe and an example Amalgam. Along with the Procedures and Devices, which are fun, the most interesting part of the chapter is the Data Sphere. Although Dimensional Science has been referred to before, it was only as "Spirit, but science" with the only mechanical effect being different gauntlet ratings. This is the first time that a fundamental alternative to the 9 standard spheres appears (with Primal Utility and Dimensional Science following in other Convention Books). It's different from Correspondence in several ways, and functionally is capable of thing Correspondence can't do (or at least can't easily) and vice versa, making it a legitimate choice whether or not to take it.

This was a strong start to the return to the Revised Convention Book cycle, which acts as a good closer to the Mage: the Ascension Revised line.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Convention Book: N.W.O.
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Convention Book: Iteration X
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/26/2019 00:30:10

This is leaps and bounds better than the original version. It handles Iteration X as people, rather than some sort of abstract representation of control. In fact, with the Revised metaplot changes, Iteration X's worst aspects have been expunged, and now they're capable of becoming the same shades of grey that the other factions of Mage are able to be.

The first half of the book is the history of the world from Iteration X's point of view, along with other bits like how they view the Traditions and Conventions. It's told by a Virtual Adept who defected to Iteration X, which is certainly an interesting perspective, and directly calls the narrative of the first Iteration X book propaganda.

The remainder covers methodologies, beliefs, and then templates and Iteration X chronicles, along with a vast array of Devices (though no Procedures, which is a shame).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Convention Book: Iteration X
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Guide to the Technocracy
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/22/2019 18:00:06

Guide to the Technocracy is one of the best Mage books published, and is essential reading for anyone looking to run Mage. The only way this will change is in the event of Technocracy: Reloaded being as good, but updated.

More specifically, this book is an in-depth guide to the world of Mage from the perspective of the Technocracy. It allows you to turn Mage from a Fantasy game into a Science-Fiction game, but still recognizably the same setting. It breaks down in more detail:

Prologue - The opening fiction isn't particularly strong, but it isn't bad. It shows an Amalgam taking out a Chantry, and the aftermath.

Introduction - The introduction sets the tone spectacularly, making it clear that (from the point of view of this book) the Technocracy are the misunderstood heroes, that the Traditions are the bad guys, and that the stereotype Technocrats of 1st Edition are not what the Union is. It hits the standard notes, and already begins adding depth, pointing out schisms within the Union and playing up a feeling of desperation for the Union...they may be winning, but Reality is still on the brink, and needs to be rescued.

Indoctrination - The first full chapter elaborates on the ideas in the Introduction: Reality is a mess, we need to save it, there are internal problems to go with the external ones, and that's why we need the player characters.

Enlightened Science -Chapter two is a deep dive into the Technocratic paradigm, or rather, the part of it that is consistent between Technocrats of various Conventions. It talks about the spheres, paradox and much of the Mage cosmology in these terms, explaining everything in scientific terms.

History Lessons - This chapter has a lot of meat in it: the Technocratic view of the history of the world, particularly the history of the Union. We see some of the schisms in action, following up on the Technocracy: New World Order book's discussion of interpretive lenses for history, though more concrete as is appropriate for what is functionally a core book (except for mechanics).

Protocols - Here's where the rules that Technocrats must live by are, such as the Precepts of Damian and the mechanics of Social Conditioning. It covers a lot of the day-to-day of being a Technocratic operative.

The Conventions - Five conventions, a bunch of methodologies, and a collection of examples fill out this chapter to help see the humans behind the technology and the masks of soulless uniformity that make the Technocracy so feared by the superstitionists.

Character Recruitment - Character creation, fairly standard. Includes rules for creating constructs, though they've largely been superseded, I believe.

Storytelling - This chapter covers how to run a Technocratic game, including what sorts of conflicts both internal and external are good for driving the drama, what sorts of resources the PCs get access to (by default), etc.

The Arsenal - BIG pile of Procedures and Devices.

Appendix - Recommended reading.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Guide to the Technocracy
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Technocracy Assembled 2
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/13/2019 20:46:43

Syndicate 4/5

Though I haven't yet read the Technocracy: Void Engineers, this is my favorite of the first edition Convention Books. The Syndicate is presented clearly, with the reasoning behind what they do and why they can't push to do more (such as abolish money and make everything free). It does a far better job pushing the Syndicate as a "good" guy than Iteration X, Progenitors and NWO did, though a big part of that might be that all three of those books praise the Nazis in some way, while this one takes credit for the one thing that Hitler did right (rebuilding the German economy) and then tries to take credit for undermining him, rather than saying things like that the camps were a great success for medical research.

It's still a first edition Technocracy book, though clearly by this point, the 2nd edition view of the Technocracy had started to take over, though it was still two years before Guite to the Technocracy was published. So it has some issues, like making the Syndicate and New World Order have a bit too much overlap (this isn't quite solved in Revised, though giving the Syndicate Primal Utility and REALLY tying them to their paradigm of the Bottom Line helped a lot).

Oh, and of course, this is in small ways a crossover book with Werewolf: the Apocalypse.

Void Engineers 5/5

I honestly love this book. From the framing narrative of a Void Engineer giving their history to a bunch of Reality Deviants (one of each of the major types, in fact) including the reveal at the end bringing the whole thing into question and giving rise to a major chunk of the Nephandic Infiltration metaplot for the Technocracy. It's really a modern Convention Book with a nuanced view of the Technocracy and one that clearly internally, at least, has them as the heroes.

It contains decent mechanics for Voidships, and seems to be the place where the exploration of the galaxy is farthest along (at least, I don't believe later books suggest that they've gotten as far as this one claims they have.) In fact, if there's a flaw, it's because them having significant extrasolar exploration is a bit beyond belief, though they justify it by Kepler and Einstein having worked together to find a hole in Relativity (Newton, also a Void Engineer apparently, had been killed a few decades earlier).

Overall, it's a very good book, with lots of useful procedures and devices, a solid narrative, and it makes it clear that Void Engineers are more complex antagonists who are more tolerant of Earthly relatiy deviants, simply because out in teh void, anything vaguely human is more friend than the natives are.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Technocracy Assembled 2
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Technocracy: Void Engineers
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/13/2019 20:46:38

I honestly love this book. From the framing narrative of a Void Engineer giving their history to a bunch of Reality Deviants (one of each of the major types, in fact) including the reveal at the end bringing the whole thing into question and giving rise to a major chunk of the Nephandic Infiltration metaplot for the Technocracy. It's really a modern Convention Book with a nuanced view of the Technocracy and one that clearly internally, at least, has them as the heroes.

It contains decent mechanics for Voidships, and seems to be the place where the exploration of the galaxy is farthest along (at least, I don't believe later books suggest that they've gotten as far as this one claims they have.) In fact, if there's a flaw, it's because them having significant extrasolar exploration is a bit beyond belief, though they justify it by Kepler and Einstein having worked together to find a hole in Relativity (Newton, also a Void Engineer apparently, had been killed a few decades earlier).

Overall, it's a very good book, with lots of useful procedures and devices, a solid narrative, and it makes it clear that Void Engineers are more complex antagonists who are more tolerant of Earthly relatiy deviants, simply because out in teh void, anything vaguely human is more friend than the natives are.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Technocracy: Void Engineers
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Technocracy: Syndicate
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/12/2019 02:43:20

Though I haven't yet read the Technocracy: Void Engineers, this is my favorite of the first edition Convention Books. The Syndicate is presented clearly, with the reasoning behind what they do and why they can't push to do more (such as abolish money and make everything free). It does a far better job pushing the Syndicate as a "good" guy than Iteration X, Progenitors and NWO did, though a big part of that might be that all three of those books praise the Nazis in some way, while this one takes credit for the one thing that Hitler did right (rebuilding the German economy) and then tries to take credit for undermining him, rather than saying things like that the camps were a great success for medical research.

It's still a first edition Technocracy book, though clearly by this point, the 2nd edition view of the Technocracy had started to take over, though it was still two years before Guite to the Technocracy was published. So it has some issues, like making the Syndicate and New World Order have a bit too much overlap (this isn't quite solved in Revised, though giving the Syndicate Primal Utility and REALLY tying them to their paradigm of the Bottom Line helped a lot).

Oh, and of course, this is in small ways a crossover book with Werewolf: the Apocalypse.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Technocracy: Syndicate
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Technocracy Assembled 1
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/10/2019 12:52:28

Here are my reviews of the individual parts:

Progenitors 2/5

This book is...confused. It wants to simultaneously leave things to the interpretation of the ST by saying "maybe this is a Progenitor scheme!" but having the PROGENITORS say that is quite odd. The in character sections should know, or at least think they know, if their own organization was involved in large scale actions. It also has the nonsensical idea that the Progenitors are somehow killing Avatars on a mass scale, which would mean no more Progenitors.

The book has some good parts, the story that the basics of the Progenitors are conveyed through are the notes of a student, though a super-unsympathetic one, who seems on the verge of going MRA terrorist by the middle.

In general, it's an ok book, but it shows badly how early in Mage it was written, before much of the setting and details had been nailed down properly, and while it did some of the lifting to make the Technocracy more than a one-note black hat, it left a LOT of work to be done.

Iteration X 3/5

This is a difficult book to review for me. On the one hand, I hate it. On the either, it is a well written book that is just part of first edition where the Technocracy is an irredeemable villain rather than a potentially valid antagonist.

It is told from the point of view of a recent recruit, who was given advanced prosthetics that were necessary due to thalidomide. He breaks conditioning for long enough to describe how terrible Iteration X is, and it's bad down to explicit comparisons with Nazis. The book gives a general overview including introducing the Artificers who are prominent when Sorcerer 's crusade is written. They effects and wonders are some of the most interesting parts of the book, along with the running theme that the Dreamspeakers are the biggest rival of the Convention, due to being the two oldest groups focusing on the spirit world and on tool use. It also introduced the Computer explicitly as a spirit that has some goal in Reality and is using Iteration X to achieve it.

Overall a solid book, but not great in many places if you prefer a sympathetic Technocracy.

NWO 3/5

This book fits into the cycle of first edition Technocracy books, and continues many of the trends that I dislike about early Mage. It depicts the New World Order, marking another Convention that is explicitly tied to the Nazis (through their "One World, One Truth, One Reality" slogan being similar to "Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Fuhrer" as well as the Nazis speaking of a "New World Order" they would establish) and generally is fine for a purely antagonist oriented book, but is badly unsatisfying in the modern era with a complex Technocracy. It does have the advantage of pointing out some debates within the the Convention, and foresaw the somewhat "post-truth" era that we find ourselves in today.

Overall, it's a decent book, but best acquired in a bundle or in Technocracy Assembled, and not as essential as the longer, more detailed and more nuanced Revised book.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Technocracy Assembled 1
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Technocracy: N.W.O.
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/10/2019 12:52:25

This book fits into the cycle of first edition Technocracy books, and continues many of the trends that I dislike about early Mage. It depicts the New World Order, marking another Convention that is explicitly tied to the Nazis (through their "One World, One Truth, One Reality" slogan being similar to "Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Fuhrer" as well as the Nazis speaking of a "New World Order" they would establish) and generally is fine for a purely antagonist oriented book, but is badly unsatisfying in the modern era with a complex Technocracy. It does have the advantage of pointing out some debates within the the Convention, and foresaw the somewhat "post-truth" era that we find ourselves in today.

Overall, it's a decent book, but best acquired in a bundle or in Technocracy Assembled, and not as essential as the longer, more detailed and more nuanced Revised book.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Technocracy: N.W.O.
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Technocracy: Progenitors
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/08/2019 22:10:28

This book is...confused. It wants to simultaneously leave things to the interpretation of the ST by saying "maybe this is a Progenitor scheme!" but having the PROGENITORS say that is quite odd. The in character sections should know, or at least think they know, if their own organization was involved in large scale actions. It also has the nonsensical idea that the Progenitors are somehow killing Avatars on a mass scale, which would mean no more Progenitors.

The book has some good parts, the story that the basics of the Progenitors are conveyed through are the notes of a student, though a super-unsympathetic one, who seems on the verge of going MRA terrorist by the middle.

In general, it's an ok book, but it shows badly how early in Mage it was written, before much of the setting and details had been nailed down properly, and while it did some of the lifting to make the Technocracy more than a one-note black hat, it left a LOT of work to be done.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Technocracy: Progenitors
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A Phoenix Rising
Publisher: White Wolf
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/05/2019 16:08:14

This product has a lot of potential, and I would love to see it expanded. It talks about some circumstances under which a new Horizon council could be formed, and what that would mean for Tradition mages, Technocrats and Disparates. It's well done, with good art (though the layout is just slightly off in a few ways) but the biggest thing it did was leave me wanting more, coming off as more of a sketch than anything else, though it never claims to be more, being a "jumpstart."



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
A Phoenix Rising
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