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Liminal Quickstart
by Daniel A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/08/2019 00:32:47

Check out Michal's full review HERE

Tying it all together, how accessible is the game to players? I would say reasonably so. Liminal’s structure helps the players build their crew and the GM to create a case they’ll work on. The game’s mechanics are on the simpler and lighter side, so creating your character is easy enough.

The flipside to this is that there’s not as much variety among the player characters as in some other games. Unlike with Chronicles of Darkness, you can create magicians, vampires, werewolves, faeries or mortals with the basic book and play them in the same group. But their powers will be ultimately represented by the same traits, rather than the different power sets of Chronicles.

One major upside here is that it’s much easier to play “clued-in mortals” as the game terms them, in Liminal than in the Chronicles of Darkness. The only Chronicles game to really give mortal humans agency is Hunter: the Vigil. Here you can play them alongside supernatural beings and magicians.

All in all, if someone wants to play an urban fantasy game about characters who exist on the boundary between worlds, solve mysteries and play politics among centuries-old organizations and groups, Liminal looks like a fine choice that won’t bog down an unexperienced group, or one that prefers story to mechanics, in details.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Liminal Quickstart
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John Carter of Mars Core Rulebook
by Daniel A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/08/2019 00:31:27

See Molly's full review HERE

The world-building aspects of the JCOM RPG are genuinely quite good. A lot of effort went into it, helped along by the fact that there are 11 books and a substantial number of comics to build off of. This results in a few things that lead to a rather open-ended experience for those wishing to create a game.

First of all—and this is quite clever and helps to avoid a common issue in doing a licensed RPG—there are three eras of the world that you’re able to set your adventure in. One is set when the titular character first arrives, before he started making waves, thus allowing you to set your adventures years before he showed up without issue. Another is set during the time when John Carter was established but not quite viewed as the savior of all of Barsoom, and thus allows you to set up your own reputations, or even build a kingdom, without worrying about upsetting him. And the third is set when John Carter rules all of Barsoom, which makes making a name for yourself difficult, but allows for the most interaction with canon heroes if that’s your thing.

And that era system applies to the races you can play as too. There are five races you can play as; your backstory, culture, and how NPCs react to you will all change based on which race and what era. For example, a Green Martian from the early era will come from a very grim and almost Objectivist society, but as time passes they become a much more open and friendly people. The Okar (Yellow Martians) will be very isolationist and arrogant in the early eras, with only a vague idea of what’s happening in the rest of the world outside of their cities, but will be more involved and informed in later ones. Things like that.

It’s honestly a rather good setup. There’s enough to give both the player and the DM (here called the Narrator) plenty of information and a firm foundation (heck, there’s a not insignificant portion of the manual devoted to the history of the planet, and the cultures of the various factions of the races) but allowing for freedom to make your own choices and not be rail-roaded by the canon too much.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
John Carter of Mars Core Rulebook
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City of Mist Core Book
by Daniel A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/08/2019 00:28:55

Cat's full review HERE

It’s an ordinary day, and you are an ordinary person. Until something happens and you realize you are, in fact, not an ordinary person. This moment, this awakening, will change everything for you. And naturally, you probably have some questions. The good news is there are more people like you out there. The bad news is that they don’t have the answers yet either. Team up together and start investigating in City of Mist from Son of Oak Game Studio (distributed by Modiphius).

City of Mist is a roleplaying game where players take on the role of Rifts—ordinary individuals that are simultaneously a powerful mythical entity. The exact nature of this entity, or Mythos, is largely a mystery to your character, and that mystery is where the journey begins. Your efforts to uncover answers will be thwarted by the very force that kept you in the dark for so long: The Mist. The Mist is what keeps the City seemingly ordinary. Sleepers, those who have not awakened to a Mythos, will forget or excuse any legendary abilities they come into contact with. Players will be balancing their Mythos with their normal lives or Logos. When your character goes through something major, you have the choice to turn it into a Moment of Evolution. This is a player character choice, not the choice of the Master of Ceremonies (MC).

This all works through the Themes that form the basis of a character’s identity. Some of these are Mythos, others are Logos. A Moment of Evolution turns one into the other. If at any point all of a player’s Mythos has become Logos, they become a Sleeper again. The opposite, all Mythos and no Logos, turns a character into an Avatar, completely at the whims of whatever force is inside them.

This focus on character choice is a driving factor in City of Mist. There are rules, of course. Players have eight core actions they can take, though even these emphasize the importance of choice. The Take the Risk action lets players attempt something outrageous, giving fate the chance to let them succeed. Failure results in a consequence, and this is when the MC gets to make their own choices.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
City of Mist Core Book
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Legacy: Rhapsody of Blood (Worlds of Legacy 4)
by Björn L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/21/2019 12:41:53

Review from Mephisto 69 Online Add-On (https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/261389/Mephisto-69-Online-AddOn), translated from German (find orignal German review below)

RHAPSODY OF BLOOD

Besides the usual game world of Legacy: Life Among the Ruins, most of the new game worlds of the Worlds of Legacy series are also futuristic. Here Rhapsody of Blood offers an alternative with its Gothic Action background. In the game, the so-called castle enters our reality once per generation. The influence of the castle corrupts everything with nightmares and the dark magic available to the respective ruler of the castle. The evil deeds emanating from the castle successively increase the power of the Regent, until he can finally perform a terrible ritual with the unholy Grail, which changes the world forever. But the Regent does not remain unchallenged, and several organizations send their best fighters to invade the castle, face the Regent and stop the ritual. In the end, however, the most powerful fighter of the good must decide whether he wants to use the unholy Grail himself and is willing to pay the price.

Rhapsody of Blood uses the classic approach of Legacy and offers two levels of play. On one level, it's the so-called bloodlines that face the dark power of the castle generation after generation. They include legendary heroes, magicians, churches, and other archetypal organizations. While these bloodlines are responsible for the strategy, it is the adventurers who enter the mysterious castle as individual characters and face their horrors. The idea is that the castle overlays and coexists with our ordinary reality - so it does not have to look like a physical castle. The respective Regent and his henchmen have their common theme. While the player characters can break the power of the respective Regent, the castle comes back in the next generation with a new Regent, and the fight starts again.

Rhapsody of Blood has a well-designed background with a fascinating gothic fantasy flair. As usual, the rules are rather abstract, and the stories run according to a fixed scheme, which may lose some of its charms after a few stories. But the setting offers enough material for a few confrontations with the castle and its Regent. Thematically, this World of Legacy is my personal favorite so far.

Deutsche Version

RHAPSODY OF BLOOD

Neben der Standard-Spielwelt von Legacy: Life Among the Ruins sind die meisten zusätzlichen Spielwelten der Worlds of Legacy-Reihe futuristisch angehaucht. Hier bietet Rhapsody of Blood mit seinem Gothic-Action-Hintergrund eine Alternative. Im Spiel tritt einmal pro Generation die sogenannte Burg in unsere Realität ein. Der Einfluss der Burg korrumpiert alles mit Albträumen und der dunklen Magie, die dem jeweiligen Regenten der Burg zur Verfügung steht. Die von der Burg ausgehenden Untaten steigern sukzessive die Macht des Regenten, bis er schließlich ein schreckliches Ritual mit dem unheiligen Gral durchführen kann, das die Welt für immer verändert. Doch der Regent bleibt nicht unangefochten, und mehrere Organisationen schicken ihre besten Streiter los, in die Burg einzudringen, den Regenten zu stellen und das Ritual zu stoppen. Am Ende muss der mächtigste Streiter des Guten allerdings entscheiden, ob er selbst den unheiligen Gral benutzen will und bereit ist, den Preis dafür zu zahlen.

Rhapsody of Blood verwendet den klassischen Ansatz von Legacy und bietet somit zwei Spielebenen. Auf der einen Ebenen sind es die sogenannten Blutlinien, die sich Generation für Generation der finsteren Macht der Burg stellen. Sie umfassen legendäre Helden, Magier, Kirche und weitere archetypische Organisationen. Während diese Blutlinien für die Strategie verantwortlich sind, sind es die Abenteurer, die als Einzelcharaktere in die mysteriöse Burg eindringen und sich ihren Schrecken stellen. Die Idee dabei ist, dass die Burg sich mit unserer normalen Realität überlagert und mit ihr koexistiert – so dass das Ganze nicht wie eine physische Burg erscheinen muss. Der jeweilige Regent und seine Schergen haben ein dazu passendes gemeinsames Thema. Die Spielercharaktere können die Macht des jeweiligen Regenten zwar brechen, doch kommt die Burg in der nächsten Generation mit einem neuen Regenten zurück und der Kampf beginnt erneut.

Rhapsody of Blood hat einen gut gestalteten Hintergrund mit gelungenem Gothic-Fantasy-Flair. Wie gehabt sind die Regeln eher abstrakt, und auch hier verlaufen die Geschichten nach einem festen Schema, was vielleicht nach einigen Durchgängen an Reiz verliert, für ein paar Auseinandersetzungen mit der Burg und dem Regenten aber durchaus ausreicht. Thematisch ist diese Welt von Legacy bisher mein persönlicher Favorit.

(Björn Lippold)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legacy: Rhapsody of Blood (Worlds of Legacy 4)
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Legacy: Generation Ship (Worlds of Legacy 1) PDF
by Björn L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/21/2019 12:31:27

Review from Mephisto 69 Online Add-On (https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/261389/Mephisto-69-Online-AddOn), translated from German (find orignal German review below)

GENERATION SHIP

In Generation Ship, one of the Worlds of Legacy with alternative settings for Legacy, players can experience what it's like to survive in a generation ship on a journey to distant worlds. Unfortunately, some humans have awakened too early. They now have to survive for generations in a spaceship that was never designed to be inhabited by humans outside of cold sleep. And it is a ship that the subsequent generations hardly understand and that offers many secrets to be solved if it is ever to reach its destination.

The six different families and the eight individual characters on the two levels of play try to reactivate essential ship systems in the different ages. Ideally, the game should end with the planet fall, i.e. the arrival at the destination. Generation Ship is more futuristic and provides a clear objective to be achieved in a limited number of ages: The planet must be reached with an intact ship. This background combines classic science fiction with the theme of recovering lost technology. Although Generation Ship keeps close to the atmosphere of Legacy, the book contains a coherent and recommendable alternative setting for fans of classic Science Fiction.

Deutsche Version

GENERATION SHIP

In Generation Ship, einer der Worlds of Legacy mit alternativen Hintergründen, können die Spieler erleben, wie es ist, in einem Generationenschiff auf der Reise zu entfernten Welt zu überleben. Leider ist ein Teil der Menschen zu früh erwacht und muss sich generationenlang in einem Raumschiff durchschlagen, das nie dafür ausgelegt war, von Menschen außerhalb des Kälteschlafs bewohnt zu werden. Und es ist ein Schiff, das die nachfolgenden Generationen kaum verstehen und das viele zu lösende Geheimnisse bietet, wenn es je sein Ziel erreichen soll.

Die sechs verschiedenen Familien und die acht individuellen Charaktere auf den zwei Spielebenen versuchen, in den verschiedenen Zeitaltern essenzielle Schiffssysteme zu reaktivieren. Im Idealfall soll das Spiel mit dem Planetenfall, also der Ankunft am Zielort, abschließen. Generation Ship ist futuristischer und liefert eine klare Zielsetzung, die in einer begrenzten Zahl an Zeitaltern zu erfüllen ist: Der Planet muss mit einem intakten Schiff erreicht werden. Damit wird klassische Science Fiction mit dem Ansatz kombiniert, verlorene Technologie wiederzugewinnen. Auch wenn Generation Ship sich nah an der grundsätzlichen Atmosphäre von Legacy hält, enthält das Buch für Fans klassischer SciFi ein stimmiges und empfehlenswertes Alternativsetting.

(Björn Lippold)



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legacy: Generation Ship (Worlds of Legacy 1) PDF
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Black Void: Core Book
by James S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/25/2019 10:55:34

So, for some time now, we’ve had a number of RPGs inspired by the works of Robert Howard (swords-&-sandals, low-magic barbarian extravaganzas), and plenty of RPGs inspired by H.P. Lovecraft (the 20th Century vs. Things Man Wasn’t Meant To Know), but we’ve had very few, if any, games inspired by the third of the “Weird Tales Big Three,” Clark Ashton Smith. Smith was a poet whose prose more resembles Lovecraft’s than Howard’s, but rather than set his fantasies amid the fledgeling nations of Antediluvian Earth or the dream-worlds of the sleeping, most of Smith’s tales took place on worlds that were nearing their expiration date, worlds that knew about life on other planets around other stars, worlds that knew plenty about the unfathomable depths of Reality, but that had, essentially, learned to accept it and move on. These worlds had either devolved to a “pre-medieval state,” or never gotten past that state in the first place, and the result was starfaring wizards and “cosmic magic” and a sort of Science Fantasy that really helped to put the Weird in “Weird Tales.”

Enter “Black Void.”

“Black Void,” created by the good folks at the appropriately named Black Void Games, and distributed by Modiphius, comes in at a bit over 400 pages of Smith-esque Weird Fantasy goodness. The basic conceit of the game is that there’s a fairly stark divide between the Cosmic (that which we know and know to be “true”) and the Void (those chaotic, unnameable places where Azathoth and his buddies hang out). Rarely do the two cross paths, but when they do, Bad Shit happens, and when it happens on Earth, circa 2000 BCE, most of our planet is destroyed by Void Storms, and the peoples of the ancient Near East are tossed through the resulting rift to the world of Llyhn, where they end up on the low end of the ladder, surrounded by alien races who have been doing this Reality-Shredding Obscenities thing for quite some time now. We can’t find our way back to our home world, but we can make new homes, out there among the stars, as long as we do it before the bigger, badder species in our general vicinity decide to wipe us out.

I find the book to be fairly well-organized. Choices were made that I would not have made; e.g., I usually like to see an overview of the rules before I jump into character creation, that way I know why I’m putting X number of points into this stat or Y number into that skill.You’ll probably be doing some flipping back and forth for chargen, and this extends to play; “Black Void” is a very “chart-y” game, and they’ve got charts for magical mishaps, blood ritual results, losing sanity, and combat critical hits a la WFRP. In fact, a lot of this game reminds me of the older editions of WFRP: A nice, simple base mechanic (in this case, roll a d12, add your modifiers, and try to get over a target number) to which has been added a number of wrinkles that will probably frustrate some gamers and delight others.

That Warhammer comparison could probably be extended to the tone of the game as well, and this is where they lost me a wee bit. The game proclaims to be about cosmicism: “Poor little Humanity, adrift in a vast universe, unaware of the True Nature of things, and unloved by any higher power that might deign to assist us.” It’s definitely grimdark, and the setting material and various quotes throughout the book reflect that idea: “We suck, no one cares, and we’ll all die alone.” I, however, tend to view cosmicism a bit differently (and this may just be me), and feel that, if there’s no God to help us up when we fall down, there’s also no God to spank us when we break the rules; Humanity is in a pretty tight spot in “Black Void,” to be certain, but they’ve also been given the gift of greater comprehension and the opportunity to (given time) raise themselves to the level of the aliens around them. In fact, a quote you see in several spots throughout the book is “Survival is only the beginning…”, and I feel like the writers could’ve leaned into that mantra a bit more rather than play the nihilism card. This is, of course, something that can be adjusted to taste by the GM (or, as they’re known in “Black Void,” the Arbiter), but prepare yourself for a lot of bitter, black tears on your first reading.

All in all, I’m quite happy with my purchase of this game. I feel like the system is solid, if a little fiddly at times with the charts and tables, and the fluff is well-written, if a little maudlin. Best of all, I finally get the Clark Ashton Smith roleplaying game I’ve always wanted: Wooden galleys with shadowy oarsmen sailing to distant, dying stars; magicians consorting with alien seers in incense-filled cyclopean temples; a vast galaxy that contains plenty of chances for madness and death, but opportunities for wonder as well; and a flavor of Fantasy that, while not entirely unique to RPGs, is seldom seen and which provides a refreshing newness to the hobby.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Black Void: Core Book
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Black Void: Core Book
by Jess D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/19/2019 23:32:05

I saw the art on this book and had to check it out. After the read I wasn't disappointed with my purchase.

The setting is remniscent of Dungeons and Dragons' Planescape, with a slightly more horror bent. It is unique among most fantasy settings in that it has a more Middle Eastern/Sumerian vibe to it than general West European. The writing is solid and the art is top notch. I had to knock it down a star because the layout is fairly poor, hiding most of the actual setting information past Chapter 7, which strikes me as a strange desicion. But aside from that minor gripe, I highly recommend the book and look forward to seeing what further products they put out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Achtung! Cthulhu: Secret War Documents
by Carl B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/24/2019 06:47:49

Perfect ... just what I need to start my WW2 era campaign. Great job! More like this please ...



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Achtung! Cthulhu: Secret War Documents
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Devil's Run: Quickstart
by Bob V. G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/19/2019 19:47:32

Today I soloed my way through Devil's Run Quickstart. It is free on DriveThruRPG. The first 26 pages are the rules. The remaining 25 pages are for the adventure. This is a three hour adventure, designed for a dungeon master and several characters. I used six first level characters (the ones provided). I also used the Mythic Game Master Emulator. This fun adventure starts with two quests. I did start both of them, but I got distracted and did my own thing. Raizar was mauled by a beast. It was a bloody death. My others did survive. I acquired the Black War Rig (vehicle) and a new member for my "gang". With the rules included, you can not roll up a character. I did like the variety of the ones that were included. I used the 2D20 rules that are also included. You do have a choice of using the Savage Worlds rules. I like the rules for effects and momentum (2D20). A very entertaining product and it is free.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Devil's Run: Quickstart
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Fallout: Wasteland Warfare - RPG (Expansion Book)
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/11/2019 05:41:45

Whilst I am not overly familiar with the Fallout franchise, I am a sucker for post-apocalyptic settings. When offered the review copy, I spent an evening reading Nukapedia Fallout Wiki only to discover that the setting was compelling enough to explore further. The Wasteland Warfare RPG Expansion is designed primarily for folks who have purchased the Wasteland Warfare minis game and want to branch off into role-playing sessions. As long as you have this background knowledge as your lens, there will be very few surprises. As such, the game assumes you have the custom dice, character cards, and other card decks included in the minis box. That said, the purchase of this game includes the digital character cards and playmats, so this alleviates some of the issues. You could also buy the requisite decks, and the custim dice seperately if you really just want the RPG experience.

The expansion book allows you toplay a wide selection of character types, from fixers, researchers, pilots, foragers, and bandits, through to infantry, snipers, Brotherhood of Steel Paladins, and even ghouls or a Mr Handy Robot. Most of the game is icon-driven as shorthand, so the icon reference sheet will be a must at the table (although I'd imagine that those already playing the miniatures game, or playing the RPG for a sustained period of time will learn the icons). Characters are customised by selecting Gifts (such as Dead Aim, Famous, Sense of Time, or Wealthy), Scars (such as Hemophiliac, Dullard, or Diseased), and then some Perks (like Bloody Mess, which means that enemies tend to be intimidated by displays of your combat techniques; or Lead Belly, allowing you to ignore the irradiation effects from consuming tainted food and drink; and every party will love Scrapper as it generates more resources when scrounging).

The system is very straightforward; with Tests conducted on Skill Dice, Armour Dice, or any of the four Effect Dice. The results are interpreted and applied depending on the type of test required. At this stage, I want to commend the authors for the use of icons - on p. 52 there is specific mention of the icon design incorporating colour blindness; thus any gamer accessing this book who percieves colour differently can rely on the icon shape to indicate the type of dice rolled, rather than simply the colour. As the dice are all very different, identifying them becomes relatively simple too. It's the first time I've seen a company consider this in game design.

Included in the book are rules for iincorporating the RPG with the Wasteland Warfare miniatures game which may be of interest to gamers seeking to maximise their enjoyment and use of both games, and again is a nice touch. The one hundred pages of setting background, rules, and advice is rounded off by a chapter for the Overseer (GM) with plenty of tips on running games that fit the Fallout mood. The remainder of the book is given over to a thirty page module (very interesting premise with lots of potential), five pages of miniature gallery photos, a one-page icon reference (that also includes the page numbers upon which those concepts are found), and an index. For a 138-page book, this fits a lot in, and gives you the tools to play in the Fallout Wasteland. I'd imagine those more familiar with the video-game franchise will be able to make excellent use of the book, but for someone who was only vaguely familiar with the setting (I now know why you need to collect Caps, and how important Vault-Tec is, so I'm getting there) I can see so much potential for post-apocalyptic mayhem. The only rules I failed to see in the book concern vehicles (vehicles are mentioned in a lot of the background setting sections, and the images show wrecked cars, so I assume vehicles exist). That said, there are plenty of repair, Armour, and Object rules that creating your own shouldn't be too difficult (it certainly beats walking everywhere, and scavenging fuel would be a session of challenge, I'm sure).

In all, this has a lot of promise, and I intend to try it out very soon. One of my gaming group has the miniatures game, so between us we have the resources to host a sessionor four. I'm very much looking forward to downing a Nukacola, fending off ghouls, and scavenging for my life in the Wasteland. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fallout: Wasteland Warfare - RPG (Expansion Book)
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Fallout: Wasteland Warfare RPG Expansion
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/11/2019 05:39:29

Whilst I am not overly familiar with the Fallout franchise, I am a sucker for post-apocalyptic settings. When offered the review copy, I spent an evening reading Nukapedia Fallout Wiki only to discover that the setting was compelling enough to explore further. The Wasteland Warfare RPG Expansion is designed primarily for folks who have purchased the Wasteland Warfare minis game and want to branch off into role-playing sessions. As long as you have this background knowledge as your lens, there will be very few surprises. As such, the game assumes you have the custom dice, character cards, and other card decks included in the minis box. That said, the purchase of this game includes the digital character cards and playmats, so this alleviates some of the issues. You could also buy the requisite decks, and the custim dice seperately if you really just want the RPG experience.

The expansion book allows you toplay a wide selection of character types, from fixers, researchers, pilots, foragers, and bandits, through to infantry, snipers, Brotherhood of Steel Paladins, and even ghouls or a Mr Handy Robot. Most of the game is icon-driven as shorthand, so the icon reference sheet will be a must at the table (although I'd imagine that those already playing the miniatures game, or playing the RPG for a sustained period of time will learn the icons). Characters are customised by selecting Gifts (such as Dead Aim, Famous, Sense of Time, or Wealthy), Scars (such as Hemophiliac, Dullard, or Diseased), and then some Perks (like Bloody Mess, which means that enemies tend to be intimidated by displays of your combat techniques; or Lead Belly, allowing you to ignore the irradiation effects from consuming tainted food and drink; and every party will love Scrapper as it generates more resources when scrounging).

The system is very straightforward; with Tests conducted on Skill Dice, Armour Dice, or any of the four Effect Dice. The results are interpreted and applied depending on the type of test required. At this stage, I want to commend the authors for the use of icons - on p. 52 there is specific mention of the icon design incorporating colour blindness; thus any gamer accessing this book who percieves colour differently can rely on the icon shape to indicate the type of dice rolled, rather than simply the colour. As the dice are all very different, identifying them becomes relatively simple too. It's the first time I've seen a company consider this in game design.

Included in the book are rules for iincorporating the RPG with the Wasteland Warfare miniatures game which may be of interest to gamers seeking to maximise their enjoyment and use of both games, and again is a nice touch. The one hundred pages of setting background, rules, and advice is rounded off by a chapter for the Overseer (GM) with plenty of tips on running games that fit the Fallout mood. The remainder of the book is given over to a thirty page module (very interesting premise with lots of potential), five pages of miniature gallery photos, a one-page icon reference (that also includes the page numbers upon which those concepts are found), and an index. For a 138-page book, this fits a lot in, and gives you the tools to play in the Fallout Wasteland. I'd imagine those more familiar with the video-game franchise will be able to make excellent use of the book, but for someone who was only vaguely familiar with the setting (I now know why you need to collect Caps, and how important Vault-Tec is, so I'm getting there) I can see so much potential for post-apocalyptic mayhem. The only rules I failed to see in the book concern vehicles (vehicles are mentioned in a lot of the background setting sections, and the images show wrecked cars, so I assume vehicles exist). That said, there are plenty of repair, Armour, and Object rules that creating your own shouldn't be too difficult (it certainly beats walking everywhere, and scavenging fuel would be a session of challenge, I'm sure).

In all, this has a lot of promise, and I intend to try it out very soon. One of my gaming group has the miniatures game, so between us we have the resources to host a sessionor four. I'm very much looking forward to downing a Nukacola, fending off ghouls, and scavenging for my life in the Wasteland. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fallout: Wasteland Warfare RPG Expansion
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Star Trek Adventures Quickstart
by Greg B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/09/2019 08:56:58

This is a great purchase if you are thinking of dipping your toes into the world of Star Trek Adventures. A rule book giving a rundown on all the basics you need to know, a brilliant multi part adventure for your pregenerated crew to boldly investigate.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trek Adventures Quickstart
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Star Trek Adventures: A Forest Apart
by Robb S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/08/2019 19:48:32

This is an excellent, well written adventure. The only problem, without using spoilers, is with the moral dilemma that forms the crux of the adventure isnt actually a dilema. What is presented as a possible violation of the Prime Directive isnt and cant be. Characters cant be responsible for what a species they aid does later... or you could never help anyone, for fear they might do something objectionable decades later. Other than that, this is a great adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trek Adventures: A Forest Apart
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Star Trek Adventures Gamesmaster Screen & Player References + TNG & TOS character sheets
by Adrian S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/03/2019 07:35:19

A GM Screen is an essential part of my gaming kit. Whilst constructing your own is extremely easy with .pdf books, it's always good to have a rpeconstructed option. This bundle includes a printer-friendly 4-panel screen with a good selection of often-used charts, and provides stunning artwork for the exterior of the screen. It also includes the character sheets for the Original Series, and Next Generation crew. The main items I found useful on these sheets were the Values as inspiration for character creation. By showing players these character sheets, they were able to create their own character Values with some ease, but unless you intend to allow the players to take these as their characters there isn't a lot of added value to their inclusion. The Quadrant Map is spectacular, and I'd like to see if I can print this off in A3, or larger as it provides a great map to place on the table during play as a ready-reference. Overall, this is a useful package, but at the time of review, the price point is high. The nearly AUD30.00 price tag is something I'd consider were this in print and on the shelf at my FLGS, but not for digital-only files that I need to print and then construct. The usefulness of the product, production values, and reusability are all very high - it only loses stars for me due to perceived value for money alone.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trek Adventures Gamesmaster Screen & Player References + TNG & TOS character sheets
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Star Trek Adventures: Core Rulebook
by Adrian S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/01/2019 19:44:49

As a long-term but casual fan, I've never been tempted to try a Star Trek RPG before, despite the previous incarnations; but I am glad that I have run Star Trek Adventures as this game has become a staple at my table. As one would expect with game built on existing intellectual property, it presents ways 'to boldly go', exploring the galaxy and the myriad of tales and encounters that such a rich franchise offers. The default time period is Star Trek: The Next Generation, but it provides plenty of advice for adapting the game to other parts of the Star Trek chronology.

The book is remarkably comprehensive in both the types of Starfleet roles, and alien races represented across the organisation. Equipment and starships runs the list of the iconic and easily recognisable, essentially giving you all the tools to make this feel like an episode of Star Trek.

Character creation is a points-buy system modified by Life Path. We found the Life Path extremely useful to generate quirks and to shape broader views for each character that really provides a spark of life and key ideas around which any player can anchor the portrayal of their character. There is flexibility in the Life Path to either roll for a result, or select a result that directly aligns with the players ideas. This is a rewarding part of character creation; and gave some great motivations for the characters at our table (from the Bajoran Medical Officer who studied medicine after his village was ravaged by disease, to our Vulcan overcoming an 'illogical' distrust of transporters after an accident almost left him dead).

Where the system really excels is in the inclusion of Values. As the word suggests, these are core beliefs that influence a characters’ behaviour and how they respond to situations. They require a lot of thought from the player, but offer a rich yet simple tool for role-playing. Interestingly, they come into play by offering some advantages when a character acts in accordance with their Values, but can cause internal conflict if situations arise that challenge that Value. For example, a Medical Officer with the Value ‘No One Dies On My Watch’ is vigorous in the defence of life and will exhaust every opportunity to preserve personnel. However, what happens to this character if a member of the Away Team willingly sacrifices themselves for the team? Lots of potential for storytelling and good roleplaying here.

The system uses the 2D20 system, and players use a combination of Attributes and Disciplines to generate the Target Number under which they must roll to succeed. Difficulty is achieved by increasing the number of successful dice rolls, and this streamlines the system well. The mechanics I enjoyed most was Momentum, and Threat – the two enjoy a symbiotic relationship that provides a good flow and pace for the game. Momentum points are generated by extra successes (or agreeing to add Threat points to the pool), can be used to buy more dice for a roll, and are accessible by all players. They can also be spent for a range of in-game effects too. Threat, on the other hand, is spent by the GM to introduce challenges, reinforcements, complications, and the like. As such the two pools work to create a dynamic play environment.

We played a long session of the game to try it out and found that character creation took about half an hour, and it took about that long again to completely pick up the rules smoothly. I created a ‘cheat sheet’ of the main rules and page numbers in advance (took me about an hour), and the session moved at a good pace – almost as though we’d been playing for months. The game mechanics supported the feeling that this was a game of Star Trek and it was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone.

The only point for improvement I noted was the book layout. There’s a lot of white space, and random deck plans, images, and communiqués inserted that don’t add a lot to the text. The section on the chronology of the universe wasn’t especially helpful; presented as a series of in-universe documents that the reader needs to contextualise. I found the Memory Alpha wiki timeline to be a great replacement for this chapter, which is a shame, because casual fans like myself don’t have an in-depth working knowledge of the universe – we just enjoy it as entertainment, and now want to game in the same universe. That said, it’s an easily remedied situation, so it should not stop you from buying the book.

I highly recommend this book, as it makes the universe highly accessible to fans who want an enjoyable, thematic win when experiencing the opportunity to boldly go where no one has gone before.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trek Adventures: Core Rulebook
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